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SHEC Member Profile: Dr. Jean Goodnow of Delta College

Dr. Jean Goodnow is President of Delta College located in University Center, Michigan. She came to Delta College in 2005. She earned a Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Higher Education Administration, a Master of Arts Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Sociology from the University of Iowa.  In addition, she has completed post-graduate study at Harvard University. 
 
Dr. Goodnow is a member of the Bay Area Chamber of Board of Directors, the Board of Directors of Midland Tomorrow, the Great Lakes Bay Regional Alliance, and the Saginaw Valley Torch Club. She also serves on the MiTech+ Board of Directors.
 
At the national level, Dr. Goodnow currently serves on the ACUPCC Steering Committee and as the Chair of the Board for the League for Innovation in the Community College.  
 
Dr. Goodnow received the Second Nature’s 1st Annual Climate Leadership Award for Outstanding Individual Climate Leadership in 2010 and The Spirit of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Award. She has also received the Shirley Gordon Phi Theta Kappa National Award and the Community College Alliance Leadership Award.  In September 2013, the Saginaw County Branch of the NAACP paid special tribute to Dr. Goodnow for her lifetime achievement in higher education and community outreach.  Dr. Goodnow is a frequent presenter at regional and national conferences on topics ranging from leadership, student success, civility and sustainability.
 
“With our long partnership with Dow Chemical, also a STEMconnector partner,” said Dr. Goodnow, “Delta College is pleased to join the STEM Higher Education Council. By connecting with national leaders from the corporate, education, non-profit and government sectors, Delta College will be able to utilize our strengths to identify and help find industry-specific solutions in chemical processing, advanced manufacturing and agriculture. We also hope to share our partnership experiences which have assisted students in exploring and selecting STEM careers.”
 
About Delta College:
Delta College serves its region by educating, enriching and empowering a diverse community of learners to achieve their personal, professional and academic goals. The College enrolls more than 15,000 students annually.
 
Located mid-Michigan, Delta College offers students 150 transfer, career and certificate programs. The college leads the way in educating for vital fields like health care, technology and alternative energy. Thirty-two percent of its students plan to transfer on to earn their bachelor’s.
 
Delta College has a $385 million impact on the local economy with its operations, and by providing a trained and ready workforce. Sixty-three percent of graduates continue to live in the area. 

Shaheen Introduces Bill to Support, Expand Afterschool STEM Education Programs

This is a press release from this Office of U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen

June, 26, 2014 - (Washington, DC) | U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) today introduced legislation to strengthen and expand afterschool programs that focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields and help encourage students to pursue careers in STEM. The Supporting Afterschool STEM Act would provide resources to support afterschool STEM programing and strengthen state, local and community partnerships that research has demonstrated is critical in building STEM-relevant skills and interest among students.
 
“Encouraging students to pursue careers in STEM fields will help meet future economic demand for skilled, high-tech workers in the 21st century,” Shaheen said. “Giving young people the opportunity to get involved in STEM after school and develop STEM-related skills at a young age will help foster our economic competitiveness in the future and ultimately help grow New Hampshire’s economy.”
 
Research shows that most students who go on to pursue STEM fields in college and beyond are exposed to and engaged in STEM activities by the 8th grade; by bringing STEM education and activites to students in afterschool programs, Shaheen’s bill will help grow our increasingly important STEM workforce.
 
“The STEM Education Coalition is proud to stand behind Senator Shaheen’s Supporting Afterschool STEM Act,” said James Brown, Executive Director of the STEM Education Coalition. “One of our Coalition’s top goals is to ensure that we are using every opportunity possible to improve student success in the critical STEM fields, and this bill will help advance the notion that afterschool and informal learning programs have a powerful role to play in addressing our national challenges in STEM education. We need to leverage federal programs in this area, along with private-sector and non-profit efforts to ensure that we are improving student access to high quality afterschool STEM experiences – and this bill will help do that.”  
 
“We commend Senator Shaheen for her ongoing commitment to afterschool programs and their role in STEM education,” said Jodi Grant, Executive Director of the Afterschool Alliance. “In New Hampshire and across the country, afterschool providers have enthusiastically embraced STEM as an important component of their offerings for children. Many providers want and need support and technical assistance to grow and scale their STEM programs. Senator Shaheen’s bill recognizes this need and will help them get those resources, leveraging existing support systems like the New Hampshire Afterschool Network and other such statewide afterschool networks.”
 
“The New Hampshire Afterschool Network is pleased to endorse this bill,” said Lynn Stanley, NH Afterschool Network Lead and Afterschool Master Professional. “Afterschool and summer programs provide children and youth hands-on, experiential activities that encourage an interest in STEM learning. Younger children exposed to fun and engaging STEM activities outside the school day are more likely to take upper level science and math classes in high school. This sets them on an educational pathway leading to STEM fields and careers.”  
 
Shaheen has made promoting STEM education one of her top priorities in the Senate and is a recognized leader by STEM Connector in their 100 Women in STEM publication. Shaheen helped launch and co-chairs the Senate STEM Caucus and has been a longtime supporter of efforts that promote programs like FIRST Robotics since her days as New Hampshire’s governor. She has met with students across New Hampshire to promote STEM programs and promote policies like the Innovation Inspiration School Grant Program to provide high schools with new incentives to invest in STEM programs.
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National Winning Student Teams in Verizon Innovative App Challenge to Show Their Apps at D.C.-Area Education Conference (PRNewswire)

This is a press release from the Verizon Foundation originally appearing on PRNewswire

Year Three of Verizon Innovative App Challenge Starts Aug. 4

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md., June 25, 2014 /PRNewswire | Simulating chemistry experiments to give students better access to science education, and helping visually impaired people navigate inside buildings are among the apps designed by eight winning Verizon Innovative App Challenge teams of middle and high school students that will be unveiled Sunday (June 29) at the 2014 national Technology Student Association conference.
 
The Verizon Innovative App Challenge is a national competition created by the Verizon Foundation in partnership with the TSA to encourage students to use technology to help solve local social issues. Since the contest's inception in 2012, nearly 2,300 student teams from across the U.S. have entered. Teams submitted more than 1,200 app concepts, and apps created through the contest have been downloaded more than 14,000 times.
 
"Verizon applauds the winning teams and all the students who entered the App Challenge," said Justina Nixon-Saintil, director of education programs for the Verizon Foundation. "In the words of President Obama, who recognized one of our winning teams at this year's White House Science Fair, these kids not only have big brains; they have big hearts. I think his words are equally descriptive of all the App Challenge winning teams.
 
"We were tremendously impressed with the awareness and empathy they displayed in identifying problems they wanted to solve, as well as with their innovation and determination in coming up with solutions using mobile technology," Nixon-Saintil said. "Also, we are pleased that many of the App Challenge winners said they are likely to pursue a career in a science, technology, engineering or math field, demonstrating that we are meeting the program's goal to inspire more students in STEM."
 
The conference will be held in National Harbor, near Washington, D.C.
 
The 2014 winning teams – from four middle schools and four high schools – and their respective apps, many are available in the Google Play store for download, are:
 
  • Helena High School, Helena, Montana – Exact 3D Extract, which uses mobile technology to create models for 3D printing. http://vz.to/3Dscanner
  • Open Window School, Bellevue, Washington – HikeAbout, which offers maps for hiking trails and safety information for hikers. http://vz.to/HikeAbout
  • Bartlett High School, Bartlett, Illinois – FITTASTICK!, which tracks food intake and exercise, and encourages fitness and weight loss through social networking. http://vz.to/FITTASTICK
  • Cheney Middle School, West Fargo, North Dakota – Snap Docs, which converts hard copy text to editable documents, using mobile technology.
  • North Hills Preparatory, Irving, Texas – Leave No Trace, which encourages reduction of energy consumption by displaying information about energy usage. http://vz.to/LeaveNoTrace
  • Resaca Middle School, Los Fresnos, Texas – Hello Navi, which assists blind or visually-impaired people in navigating inside buildings. http://vz.to/HelloNavi
  • Westford Academy, Westford, Massachusetts – Tactillium, which delivers science education through a mobile device chemistry simulator. http://vz.to/Tactillium
  • Jefferson Township Middle School, Oak Ridge, New Jersey – Super Science Girl, which inspires interest in STEM-related activities to encourage young girls to pursue science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers. http://vz.to/SuperSciGirl
Roseanne White, executive director of the Technology Student Association, said: "It has been a wonderful experience to collaborate with the Verizon Foundation on developing this STEM-focused app challenge. Mobile technology is such an important part of young people's lives today, and this is a fun and educational opportunity for students to ideate how technology can help solve a problem and learn about creating apps."
 
Since being named Best in Nation winners on Feb. 26, the students have been working with instructors at Massachusetts Institute of Technology Center for Mobile Learning @ The Media Lab, who have provided onsite and virtual training on coding using the MIT App Inventor to bring the students' apps to life. In addition, each Best in Nation team won a $20,000 grant for its school from the Verizon Foundation; a Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 tablet for each team member, courtesy of Samsung Telecommunications America; and a trip to the 2014 national TSA conference, courtesy of Verizon.
 
The winning app designs were selected by a panel of STEM and industry experts from MIT Media Lab, Samsung Mobile, the New York Hall of Science, the National Academy Foundation, National Geographic, the International Reading Association, National Center for Family Literacy, Smithsonian National Museum of American History, VGo Communications, Cisco Systems and the American Association of the Advancement of Science. Entries were judged based on their clear identification of a need or problem in a school or community, originality, creativity, the viability of the concept, and the applicability of STEM principles and practices.
 
The teams that did not advance further in the competition were given access to a self-guided app-development course developed by the MIT Media Lab's App Inventor team. The course taught the teams how to take their apps from concept to completed, user-tested apps, under the direction of each team's faculty adviser. 
 
Year Three of App Challenge Competition Runs from August through November
 
The third Verizon Innovative App Challenge opens Aug. 4 and runs through Nov. 24.
 
For more information, visit www.verizonfoundation.org/appchallenge.
 
The Verizon Foundation is focused on improving teaching and learning, particularly in underserved communities, through the use of mobile technologies to support STEM education.
 
About the Technology Student Association (TSA) 
The Technology Student Association is a national organization devoted exclusively to the needs of students engaged in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Open to young people enrolled in or who have completed technology education courses, TSA's membership includes more than 200,000 middle and high school students in 2,000 schools spanning 48 states. TSA partners with universities and other organizations to promote a variety of STEM competitions and opportunities for students and teachers. TSA is supported by educators, parents and business leaders who believe in the need or a technologically literate society. From engineers to business managers, our alumni credit TSA with a positive influence in their lives. Visit the Technology Student Association website (embed URL) http://www.tsaweb.org for more information.
 
About the Verizon Foundation
The Verizon Foundation is focused on accelerating social change by using the company's innovative technology to help solve pressing problems in education, healthcare and energy management.  Since 2000, the Verizon Foundation has invested more than half a billion dollars to improve the communities where Verizon employees work and live. Verizon's employees are generous with their donations and their time, having logged more than 6.8 million hours of service to make a positive difference in their communities.  For more information about Verizon's philanthropic work, visit www.verizonfoundation.org; or for regular updates, visit the Foundation on Facebook (www.facebook.com/verizonfoundation) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/verizongiving).
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CA Technologies Supports Citizen Schools' STEM Programs

This is a press release from CA Technologies and Citizen Schools
 
Boston, MA – June 25, 2014 | Citizen Schools, a leading national education nonprofit, announced today it has received a $50,000 donation from CA Technologies, a leading IT management software and solutions company, to help fund its science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education for students across six schools in Massachusetts.
 
Citizen Schools partners with underserved public middle schools to dramatically expand the learning day by 400 hours each academic year. During the additional school hours, the organization mobilizes AmeriCorps Teaching Fellows and volunteers from companies like CA Technologies who provide academic support and teach hands-on “apprenticeships” that help students make the connection between what they are learning now and a future career path. Over half of the skill-building apprenticeships are focused on STEM subjects and activities.
 
”We are proud to support the important work Citizen Schools is doing to expand educational opportunities for students,” said Erica Christensen, VP, Corporate Social Responsibility, CA Technologies. “Supporting STEM learning is a top priority for CA Technologies, and through initiatives like this we hope to help provide young people with the tools they need to succeed and encourage the next generation of technology leaders.”
 
The demand for professionals in the STEM fields is projected to dramatically outpace supply over the coming decades. By 2018, the U.S. is expected to face a projected shortfall of 230,000 qualified advanced-degree STEM workers. The Bureau for Labor Statistics also predicts that STEM jobs will grow 55 percent faster than non-STEM jobs over the next 10 years. Among the teenagers who express interest in science and math careers, nearly two-thirds indicate that they are discouraged from pursuing them because they do not know anyone who works in these fields or understand what people in those fields do.
 
“Our apprenticeships bring relevance and unique hands-on learning opportunities to students, sparking new interests and increasing their engagement in school,” said Tom Birmingham, Executive Director of Citizen Schools Massachusetts. “We are pleased to have CA Technologies as a partner as we work to improve and expand our STEM apprenticeships for the students and schools we serve.”
 
CA Technologies volunteers have taught apprenticeships to students in Citizen Schools in Boston, MA and New York, NY. The projects in Massachusetts have included “Measuring the Solar System” and “Life is a Laboratory,” where students transform into scientists for a semester. In New York, students created technologies to improve New York City and pitched their ideas to technology executives in “Back to the Future.”
 
About Citizen Schools
Citizen Schools is a national nonprofit organization that partners with middle schools to expand the learning day for children in low-income communities. Citizen Schools mobilizes a team of AmeriCorps educators and volunteer “Citizen Teachers” to teach real-world learning projects and provide academic support, in order to help all students discover and achieve their dreams. For more information, please visit http://www.citizenschools.org/.
 
About CA Technologies
CA Technologies (NASDAQ: CA) provides IT management solutions that help customers manage and secure complex IT environments to support agile business services. Organizations leverage CA Technologies software and SaaS solutions to accelerate innovation, transform infrastructure and secure data and identities, from the data center to the cloud. Learn more about CA Technologies at www.ca.com.
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SHEC Member Profile: Dr. Dean Evasius of Oak Ridge Associated Universities

The STEM Higher Education Council (SHEC) is proud to announce that Dr. Dean Evasius, Vice President and Director of Science Education Programs at Oak Ridge Associated Universities, will be a member of the Council.
 
Dr. Dean Evasius has been Vice President and Director of Science Education programs at ORAU since August 2012. In this role he is responsible for providing leadership for ORAU’s $240M portfolio of science education programs.
 
He previously served as Senior Advisor for Science and Head of the Office of Multidisciplinary Activities at the National Science Foundation. He also served as a Program Director in the Division of Mathematical Sciences at NSF for eight years. Prior to his time at NSF he was a research mathematician for the National Security Agency. He holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from the California Institute of Technology.
 
Regarding joining the STEM Higher Education Council, Dr. Evasius said “The STEM Higher Ed Council is a vital resource for catalyzing innovation in STEM education and workforce development. It’s uniquely positioned to promote the partnerships needed to address complex challenges.”

LEAP Program Students Show Off Learning

This is a press release from Xavier University of Louisiana
 
NEW ORLEANS (June 24, 2014) | High School participants in Xavier University’s Louisiana Engineering Advancement Program (LEAP) – part of the BP STEM Summer Institute – will make presentations demonstrating some of the things they have learned this summer during the program’s closing ceremony June 27.
 
WHAT: Closing ceremonies for Xavier University’s Louisiana Engineering Advancement Program (LEAP), funded by BP America, Inc. Students will give demonstrations of what they have learned during the program.
 
WHEN: Friday June 27, 8:00 to 11:00 a.m.
 
WHERE: Xavier Administration Building Auditorium - 1 Drexel Drive, New Orleans, LA 70125
 
Presentations will take place from 8:00 to 11:00 a.m. in the Administration Building Auditorium, with each of the 17 groups making 10-minute demonstrations based on this year's theme "Recreation, Transportation, and Communication ... the Next Generation." An awards program will follow. 
 
LEAP is one of five XU summer programs – LEAP, MathStar, BioStar, ChemStar and Exploring Computer Science – under the umbrella of the BP STEM Summer Institute, which is funded by a three-year, $750,000 grant awarded by BP America, Inc. in 2011. There are approximately 500 students involved in the five programs this summer.
 
Since 2005 BP has made several grants to Xavier, including more than $1.46 million earmarked for various XU STEM initiatives.   
 
Some 80 pre-college age students who are considering careers in engineering, mathematics and the sciences are taking advantage of the LEAP program – an  intensive four-week, non-residential honors program for students who are entering the 9th, 10th, and 11th grades in the fall – to improve their analytical reasoning and vocabulary skills.
 
The three “Star” programs are intensive preparation programs designed for students who be taking their first high school courses in those respective academic subjects in the fall. Exploring Computer Science enriches the computation-specific education of both college and high school students.

 

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Want to launch a STEM Challenge? Here are eight factors to consider:

This is a guest blog post from Michael Timmons of Skild.

Want to launch a STEM Challenge?  Here are eight factors to consider:

Hosting a challenge or competition is an underutilized way to energize and galvanize students. Challenges enable them to showcase personal or combined talents by uniquely solving problems, generating new ideas, highlighting artistic creations, or simply demonstrating skills or knowledge recently learned.

As humans, it is in our nature to compete. To survive, and remain vital, we constantly accept new challenges and strive for success. For thousands of years, societies have conducted competitions as a way to socialize or to solve problems. Today, we’re seeing more and more organizations initiating competitions as a way to engage with their core audiences. For over ten years Skild has helped over 200 organizations design, execute and manage challenges. Through hosting our own yearly competition (the Innovation Challenge) and by designing and managing challenges for others, we’ve learned the success or failure of a challenge depends on eight key points.

  1. Purpose – The best place to begin when crafting a competition is to determine the goals of hosting a successful event. Are you looking for new ideas to stimulate your product line, marketing or services? Are you aiming for new ways to get students to collaborate? Will this be a tool to teach new skills, refine developing ones and test students’ proficiency? Is this a marketing tool that will be used to introduce the public to your cause? Having students submit images or video is a great way to generate content that can be shared online through social media to spread the word about your brand.
  2. Engagement – A strong challenge connects with participants in a way that stimulates interest and ability. Careful thought needs to go into what kinds of questions and tasks are being posed. Are they too easy? Too hard? Are the submission requirements captivating or tedious? Keeping entry requirements simple in the beginning will encourage more submissions and allow you to have participants refine or expand ideas in later phases.
  3. Resources – Challenges are a fantastic way to immerse participants in your brand by enabling them to interact directly with your products or services. Additionally, providing thoroughly designed rules, guidelines, elemental instructions and reference materials will provide clarity that will enhance the quality of submissions.
  4. Timing – Knowing when and how long to run a challenge will determine the number participants. Successful student competitions generally occur in the fall when kids are back in school or in the spring. Avoid accepting submissions during winter and spring breaks, midterm and final testing periods and summertime. A good time frame for the submission period generally ranges from 9 to 12 weeks. Anything shorter doesn’t give participants enough time to prepare and submit. Anything longer and the participants tend to lose interest.
  5. Reach – You can have the most brilliant challenge in the world, but you’ll have no participants if no one knows it exists. Competition administrators should know their target audience and be prepared to take measures to market to them. Are you sending email messages to all of your students? Communicating through social media channels? Enlisting the assistance of a public relations agency to help you attract participants?
  6. Evaluation – Once entries are submitted you’ll need to appraise them with predetermined criteria. Are you measuring creativity? Feasibility? Originality? How will you determine which submissions are the best?
  7. Rewards – What will students get from this experience? Offering prizes will incentivize participants to provide quality work. Of course, money is always a predictable motivator, but successful challenges have also awarded internships and jobs, networking opportunities or high profile recognition.
  8. Competition Management – Once you have all of your challenge elements in developed, how do you pull it all together? Challenge management is the most critical piece of your event. You need a way to collect registration information, entry data and judging scores. A competition management platform, like Skild, is key to organizing all of your participants and their data in one centralized location. Competition administrators can manage the phases of an event though a timeline that keeps everything running smoothly.

If you’re thinking of hosting a STEM challenge but don’t know where to begin, Skild can help guide you through a process of refinement that will get you from the starting line to the finish line. Through the years, we’ve helped large corporations, educational institutions, and government agencies. Ready for a demo or for more information? Click here!

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Op-Ed: Bringing Innovation to Classrooms (U.S. News)

This Op-Ed originally appeared on U.S. News & World Report and is by Dr. Joseph Wilson, Managing Director of Teach For America’s math and science initiative, and Dr. Anne Jones, Senior Vice President and Chief Programs Officer of Project Lead The Way

Educators who pledge to become ‘Maker Teachers’ are leading the way.

Our kids are amazing consumers of technology. With a few taps and swipes on their mobile devices, they have nearly instant access to much of the world’s information via downloadable apps and websites. But with a projected 8.65 million U.S. workers needed by 2018 in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (collectively referred to as STEM), they need to be more than just consumers – they need to be makers.

On Wednesday, the White House hosted its first-ever Maker Faire, bringing together tinkerers and entrepreneurs of all ages to share their creations and find areas of collaboration. The “big idea” of the Maker Movement is simple: to encourage people to seek solutions to everyday problems, identify new areas of opportunity and offer contributions that advance society – in ways both silly and significant.
 
Among these “makers” were a significant number of teachers and students, reminding us that the classroom is often the nucleus for innovation.
 
This is an important memorandum. Too often in the tech sphere, we forget that discovery happens in schools as much as it happens in laboratories, engineering workshops or through expert collaborations. 
 
In New Mexico, high schooler Raquel Redshirt saw that her Navajo Nation community historically lacked access to cooking fuels due to their remote location. To try and solve this problem, Raquel studied solar ovens and created her own from local materials – a project which earned her special recognition at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair.
 
In Kansas City, Missouri, a team of students frustrated with their runny ketchup designed, tested and 3D-printed a part that separates the water from the ketchup before it gets pushed out of the bottle.
 
In Iowa, a team of middle school students developed a wheelchair that converts easily to a walker for the elderly and disabled, and in Maryland, five young girls created an app they named “Study Buddy” to help them prioritize homework, track assignments and study for upcoming tests.
 
To help connect more teachers and students with the opportunities and resources to create, Teach For America, Digital Harbor Foundation, Project Lead The Way and STEMConnector are encouraging educators to pledge to be Maker Teachers.
 
This campaign will help create a broader community of Maker Teachers to share ideas, resources, and opportunities. Tools such as the Innovation Portal, a free online platform, allow students to create and share design portfolios to help invent new solutions to problems ranging from annoying to life-threatening.
 
Our teachers and students are, quite literally, inventing us into the future – and it’s critical that we provide them with every opportunity to expand their definitions of what is possible. Through the process of making, students gain a broad yet critical skillset for operating in the jobs of tomorrow – competencies founded in math and science, with the ability to navigate ambiguity, think analytically and act strategically.
 
Teachers are the backbone of our country’s innovation, guiding students to create new methods and ideas, and forge solutions for burgeoning challenges. Pledge to become a Maker Teacher to be connected with other trailblazing educators and Maker opportunities for your classrooms and schools. 
 
Together, we can develop today’s consumers into tomorrow’s makers.

 

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SHEC Member Profile: Dr. Charles Ambrose of the University of Central Missouri

 

The STEM Higher Education Council (SHEC) is proud to announce, Dr. Charles Ambrose, President of the University of Central Missouri, will be a member of the Council.
 
After graduating from Furman with a bachelor’s degree, Dr. Ambrose earned a master’s degree at the University of Louisville and a doctoral degree in education from the University of Georgia. Dr. Ambrose has participated in many scholarly and professional activities throughout his career, and served for two years as chair of the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II Presidents Council. He currently serves on the President's Council of the Association of Governing Boards, Chair of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association, Board of Directors of the Kansas City Area Development Commission, and on the Presidential Task Force on Tennis and Higher Education of the United States Tennis Association. In addition to teaching experiences, his higher education career includes positions as vice president for advancement at Carson-Newman College, assistant to the chancellor for university advancement at Western Carolina University, and executive assistant to the president at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities in Washington, D.C.
 
In a statement regarding the STEM Higher Education Council, President Ambrose remarked, “as a new member of the STEM Higher Education Council, the University of Central Missouri is excited about the opportunity to become part of the national dialogue regarding STEM education. We look forward to working with other colleges and universities nationwide to promote stronger collaboration between institutions of higher education, industry, and government to improve access to new STEM career pathways. We also hope to share knowledge gained by our experiences with The Missouri Innovation Campus as the Council considers model partnerships that will help achieve STEM outcomes and meet workforce demand.“
 
Becoming the University of Central Missouri’s 15th president Aug. 1, 2010, Dr. Charles Ambrose is a fervent advocate for servant leadership, engaged learning and innovations in higher education to reduce student debt, accelerate degree completion, and meet national workforce needs. His leadership in this area helped create The Missouri Innovation Campus (MIC) partnership, which prompted a visit to UCM by U.S. President Barack Obama in July 2013.
 
About The Missouri Innovation Campus (MIC)
Established in fall 2012, The Missouri Innovation Campus (MIC) is a progressive initiative between the University of Central Missouri, Lee’s Summit R-7 School District, Metropolitan Community College (MCC), community organizations and business partners to revolutionize the way students learn and work. Taking advantage of a curriculum that was designed with considerable input from business partners, MIC students prepare for careers in high-demand, STEM-related career fields, while earning their degrees faster and reducing the burden of student debt.
 
The MIC is under the direction of Stan Elliott, who previously served in the Lee’s Summit R-7 School District. He can be reached by phone at 660-543-8256 or by email at Elliott@ucmo.edu. Additional information about The Missouri Innovation Campus is available online at ucmo.edu/about/mic/.

The Fab Foundation Launches Nationwide Effort to Provide Access to Hands-on Learning Opportunities

This is a press release from The Fab Foundation

The Fab Foundation aims to open 10 ‘Fab Labs’ around the U.S. by 2015 with support from the Chevron Corporation, as part of the energy industry leader's recently announced $30 million commitment and call-to-action to support STEM education and project-based learning methods.The announcement was made today during the first-ever White House Maker Faire.

Washington, D.C. (PRWEB) June 18, 2014 | The Fab Foundation today announced that it will open up to 10 fabrication laboratories (Fab Labs) across the country in the next three years based upon a generous grant from Chevron Corporation. The new Fab Labs will be located throughout the U.S. in areas where Chevron operates, including the first two facilities in Bakersfield and Richmond, California. When complete, these facilities will provide approximately 20,000 students and adults hands-on science and technology experiences. This new grant is part of Chevron’s recently announced $30 million commitment and call-to-action to support STEM education and project-based learning methods.

The announcement was made today during the first-ever White House Maker Faire. There, the Fab Foundation and Chevron partnered with the MIT Mobile Fab Lab to demonstrate how students, faculty, tech enthusiasts, and engineers use digital fabrication tools. Innovations shown include 3D Printed guitars, a cargo bike with a mobile solar charging business onboard, Machines that Make Machines, a prosthetic foot for multiple activities, and a desktop stereolithography 3D Printer. And from the younger Makers, a 3D Cardboard construction kit called the Great Invention Kit (GIK) will be given to attendees.
 
The Mobile Fab Lab is a computer-controlled design and machining fab lab housed in a trailer. This first mobile lab was built in August 2007 by the Center for Bits and Atoms at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The mobile lab includes the same computer controlled fabrication machines found in fab labs world-wide such as laser cutters, 3D Printers, and CNC milling machines.
 
“Along with launching new fab labs, Chevron's grant will help build the Fab Foundation's capacity to provide access to digital fabrication across the country and around the world," commented Neil Gershenfeld, Chairman of the Fab Foundation's Board. "At the White House Maker Faire we'll be celebrating how makers are using these tools to innovate for the future."
 
Further, Fab Labs are a critical component of many STEM programs such as the successful programs at MC2STEM High School in Ohio and Mahtomedi High School in Minnesota. Curriculum around Fab Lab tools give students hands-on, applied STEM learning opportunities that cross disciplines. A Fab Lab gives students the tools to develop the practical and critical thinking skills they will need to be the inventors and innovators of the future.
 
“Few things are more important to our nation’s future than student interest and proficiency in STEM. Through our partnership with The Fab Foundation, we are proud to increase the numbers of students across the country that have access to develop project-based, critical thinking skills,” said Blair Blackwell, manager of education and corporate programs at Chevron. “This partnership underscores our commitment to ensuring that students have the foundation they need to succeed.”
 
About The Fab Foundation 
The Fab Foundation was formed February 9, 2009 to facilitate and support the growth of the international Fab Lab network. The Fab Foundation is a US non-profit 501(c) 3 organization that emerged from MIT’s Center for Bits & Atoms Fab Lab Program. Our mission is to provide access to the tools, the knowledge and the financial means to educate, innovate and invent using technology and digital fabrication to allow anyone to make (almost) anything, and thereby creating opportunities to improve lives and livelihoods around the world. Community organizations, educational institutions and nonprofit concerns are our primary beneficiaries.
 
Fab Labs are not only machines, tools and processes, but also a global community of people who want to collaborate and share knowledge. There are more than 350 Fab Labs in the world today, with another 350 in development in more than 40 countries. The community meets once a year at one of the network's Fab Labs in the world, to share best practices, form collaborations, learn about the state of the art of digital fabrication in manufacturing and research, and to make the personal connections that are so important to building the community. This year’s meeting FAB10 will happen in Barcelona in July.
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