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GW Engineering IMPACT: The Adventures of Biowoman

GW Engineering IMPACT Superhero Comics
 
The faculty at the George Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) may seem like your typical engineering professors by day, but in fact these men and women stand ready to unleash their secret powers to defeat injustice!  Read the recent adventures of Biowoman below...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Jonathan J Kaufman: New Year, New Goals…

The Power of Difference: How Inclusion Will Help Spark the STEM Revolution for the 21st Century is a monthly blog feature by Jonathan J. Kaufman that explores how the diversity of human capital will impact STEM companies’ ability to stay competitive on a global landscape. With an emphasis on the growth of select communities like those on the autism spectrum, wounded warriors and others, the feature will focus on both trends and solutions that are critical for the growth of STEM work in the digital age.

The New Year is upon us and here in New York City there is a new progressive Mayor in Bill DeBlasio. This new administration has compelled me to think about a variety of issues such as productivity, skill acquisition and more particularly upward mobility and the economic realities of our time. As I dig deeper into this idea of upward mobility I am drawn to the question of how can all Americans compete in this global economy and how can we provide the best opportunities for growth?
 
This January I am starting a coaching initiative for young adults of the autism spectrum at the Adaptations program in New York City , a program designed for young adults on the autism spectrum (www.adaptations.org). The coaching  initiative will focus around the nature of success in the work environment. As many people know one of the great strengths of those on the spectrum is in STEM fields. Corporations need to embrace this pool of human capital and understand the true value proposition to keep America competitive in the 21st Century. However, I also feel that this will lead us to a larger conversation about the value that upward mobility can play for the larger STEM community. I believe that STEM organizations should be incubators for the autism community to provide new skills, offer new economic opportunity and at the same time create new avenues of success that will be beneficial to an organizations bottom line.
 
As I embark on this new coaching group I am curious to see how they define success in the context of their work. I feel STEM organizations can play a pivotal role in modeling opportunities of different types of success that will open up new worlds to a community that is hungry for opportunity in the tech market.
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National Math and Science Initiative, UTeach Institute and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Announce National Expansion of UTeach Program

National Math and Science Initiative, UTeach Institute and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Announce National Expansion of UTeach Program (via PR Newswire)

DALLAS, Jan. 4, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The National Math and Science Initiative (NMSI) today announced the expansion of the UTeach secondary science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) teacher preparation program to five research universities…

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New Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education book celebrates 20 years of impact on DOE’s mission and national agenda

This is a press release from ORAU

Book chronicles breadth and depth of impact through timeline and feature articles

OAK RIDGE, Tenn. (BUSINESS WIRE) | Touching the lives of more than 55,000 faculty and students, 1.5 million energy workers and countless others living in communities near 500 Department of Energy (DOE) sites in 42 states, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education has made an impact nationally and internationally. From its beginnings, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, also known as ORISE, has helped DOE magnify its reach and focus its efforts on national mission and priorities.
 
“Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: Delivering Agile Missions solutions for DOE to Strengthen and Secure America”
 
The scope of this two-decade impact is now chronicled in a newly released 147-page book, “Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: Delivering Agile Missions solutions for DOE to Strengthen and Secure America,” that has been published by ORAU.
 
“As you read the report, you’ll see how the need for ORISE was apparent from the beginning,” said Andy Page, ORISE director and ORAU president and CEO. “This 20-year timeline provides evidence of how, as the world events and national priorities changed through time, DOE’s mission aligned with those needs, and ORISE provided an agile and integrated response to the agency and federal government.”
 
The “Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: Delivering Agile Missions solutions for DOE to Strengthen and Secure America” is available as a free download. Printed copies also are available at $29.95 each; those interested should email communications@orau.org.
 
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is a U.S. Department of Energy institute focusing on scientific initiatives to research health risks from occupational hazards, assess environmental cleanup, respond to radiation medical emergencies, support national security and emergency preparedness, and educate the next generation of scientists. ORISE is managed by Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU).
 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) provides innovative scientific and technical solutions to advance research and education, protect public health and the environment and strengthen national security. Through specialized teams of experts, unique laboratory capabilities and access to a consortium of more than 100 major Ph.D-granting institutions, ORAU works with federal, state, local and commercial customers to advance national priorities and serve the public interest. A 501(c)(3) nonprofit corporation and federal contractor, ORAU manages ORISE for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Visit www.orau.org for more information.
 
 
 
 
Contacts:
ORAU
Pam Bonee, 865-576-3417

 

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Instagram of the Day

While the origin of life remains mysterious, scientists are finding more and more evidence that material created in space and delivered to Earth by comet and meteor impacts could have given a boost to the start of life. Some meteorites supply molecules that can be used as building blocks to make certain kinds of larger molecules that are critical for life. Researchers have analyzed carbon-rich meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) and found amino acids, which are used to make proteins. Proteins are among the most important molecules in life, used to make structures like hair and skin, and to speed up or regulate chemical reactions. They have also found components used to make DNA, the molecule that carries the instructions for how to build and regulate a living organism, as well as other biologically important molecules like nitrogen heterocycles, sugar-related organic compounds, and compounds found in modern metabolism. Picture here is the equipment used by NASA Goddard's Astrobiology Analytical Lab to analyze very small samples. On the right is the nanoelectrospray emitter, which gives sample molecules an electric charge and transfers them to the inlet of the mass spectrometer (left), which identifies the molecules by their mass. This technology and the laboratory techniques that the Goddard lab develops to apply it to analyze meteorites will be valuable for future sample-return missions since the amount of sample likely will be limited.

Image Credit: Michael Callahan

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100Kin10 Names 31 New Partners in National Network to Grow and Retain STEM Teaching Force

100Kin10 Names 31 New Partners in National Network to Grow and Retain STEM Teaching Force (via PR Newswire)

NEW YORK, Jan. 31, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- 100Kin10, a multi-sector network addressing the national imperative to train 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers by 2021, today announced 31 new partner organizations. More and…

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At the USA Science & Engineering Festival Expo, Meet Innovators Who Are Creating Inspiring STEM Products – Just for Girls!

This post is part of our ongoing series highlighting awesome events going on at the USA Science & Engineering Festival, taking place April 26th & 27th at Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. Learn more here: blog.stemconnector.org/usa-science-engineering-festival

Research shows that girls often lose interest in STEM as young as age 8. Take a walk through a toy store and you can begin to see why - the “blue aisle” is filled with construction toys and chemistry sets, while the “pink aisle” is filled with princesses and dolls. Get set to meet a growing number of innovators who are working to give girls wider options by designing and creating exciting STEM products that are specifically intended to help inspire the next generation of female scientists and engineers! Innovators such as those from GoldieBlox, the high-powered new startup (begun by Stanford engineering grad Debbie Sterling) that is developing fascinating toys to help young girls form an early interest and skill set in engineering!

Learn More on this 2014 Stage Show: Beyond the Pink Aisle: Cool, Inspiring STEM Products for Girls
by VP of Sales for GoldieBlox, Lindsey Shepard & New York Times best-selling fiction adventure author, Andrea Beaty

Research shows that the earlier kids get interested in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), the more likely they are to go into those fields as adults.
 
But herein lies a major concern: Unfortunately, girls are losing interest in STEM as young as age 8. Take a walk through a toy store and you can begin to see why - the “blue aisle” is filled with construction toys and chemistry sets, while the “pink aisle” is filled with princesses and dolls.
 
Don’t miss Festival Expo 2014 next April when we’ll introduce you to a growing number of innovators who are working to give girls wider options by designing and creating exciting STEM products that are specifically intended to help inspire the next generation of female scientists and engineers!
 
Titled “Beyond the Pink Aisle: Cool, Inspiring STEM Products for Girls”, this must-see performance panel will include such fascinating notables as: Lindsey Shepard, vice president of Sales for GoldieBlox, the high-powered new startup (begun by Stanford engineering grad Debbie Sterling) that is creating toys to inspire girls to develop an early interest and skill set in engineering; and Andrea Beaty, the highly popular children’s book author whose recent work, Rosie Revere, Engineer,  chronicles the pursuits of the fictitious main character, Rosie - a shy but determined second grader who breaks stereotypes to build amazing gizmos and gadgets towards her dream of becoming an engineer.
 

Instagram of the Day

An Endangered Creeper — Nope, it's not a Minecraft Creeper — there's plenty of those. We're talking about the Hawaiin Honeycreeper. Many species of Hawaiian honeycreepers have persisted into the 20th century because high elevation rain forests on the islands of Kaua’i, Maui, and Hawai’i are cool enough to limit transmission of introduced avian malaria. Malaria transmission is tied closely to the effects of temperature on development of malarial parasites within their mosquito vectors and the effects of temperature and rainfall on seasonal and altitudinal changes in mosquito populations. As a result, this system may be very sensitive to recently documented increases in mean temperature in the Hawaiian Islands. USGS scientists have documented recent dramatic increases in avian malaria on the Alaka'i plateau on Kaua`i that could affect recovery of two endangered honeycreepers, the `Akikiki and `Akeke`e, and one endangered thrush, the Puaiohi.

Credit: Carter Atkinson , USGS

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Instagram of the Day

Can you 'Name that Fish'? The mesmerizing patterns on this juvenile fish last about two years before changing to adult colors of yellow and blue stripes. Give us your best guess!

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Department of Energy Hosting Interagency STEM Volunteer Fair to Engage Fed Workers

This is a Guest Post By The Office of Economic Impact and Diversity, Department of Energy

Department of Energy Hosting Interagency STEM Volunteer Fair to Engage Fed Workers in STEM Volunteering

The First Annual Federal STEM Volunteer Fair is Wednesday, February 5, 2014, 10am-2pm at the Department of Energy. The event aims to match the needs of the STEM community in the D.C. area with federal workers from all agencies seeking volunteer opportunities. Organizations will be on hand to share their story, mission, audience, and volunteer needs. The event will have a special focus on the biggest participation gaps in STEM fields – girls, women, and minorities. View our site to RSVP and see the list of participating organizations.

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